A Simple Checklist to Manage Your Creative Projects

Running a great creative project requires discipline.

You need a clear focus on the results (1).

You also have to anticipate what’s ahead of you–to know what you need to make happen and what could go wrong (2).

“Under conditions of complexity, not only are checklists a help, they are required for success.”

— Atul Gawande, The Checklist Manifesto

The following checklists are here to help you run your creative projects by (1) focusing on the results and (2) anticipating what’s going to happen.

1. Focus on the results of your creative projects

What’s the purpose of this project?

A Framework to Design Great User Experience (with Examples)

Technology shapes and reinforces how we behave.

  • We walk and run with earphones without paying attention to what’s happening around us;
  • We often check social media on our smartphones, even when we’re with friends;
  • We travel across the globe to stay in the bedroom of someone we’ve never met before;
  • We take tons of pictures of ourselves and send them to our friends and even strangers.

Doing these things may have looked crazy to our ancestors, yet even they shared similar behaviours… Humans have always liked listening to music, connecting with one-another, traveling to new places, and showing off.

How to Give Feedback That Really Helps People

Give constructive feedbackSharing constructive feedback gives you this ability to guide your team members and help them learn and grow.

Unfortunately, we never learn how to give feedback. We assume that it is intuitive; and that you should naturally master this skill.

But in practice, giving feedback feels uncomfortable.

We even often avoid doing it…

[In these reflections, I focus on “individual feedback” given to a team member (e.g. superior, peer, or subordinate). This excludes traditional employee review, team performance check-in, and managing yourself with feedback analysis.]

Feedback is an undervalued tool.

The Best Books for Entrepreneurs and Executives in 2018 (Updated)

Gathering the best books for entrepreneurs and other great resources wasn’t an easy job.

You will agree with me that there are so many books about entrepreneurship out there…

So I narrowed down the list only to the best resources. This is going to save you so much time. 😁

If you like these recommendations, share it with your friends, classmates, and colleagues.

Successful entrepreneurs, including Steve Jobs, read a lot of business books
Successful entrepreneurs, including Steve Jobs, read a lot of business books

 

The following lists focus on the crème de la crème of resources and books for entrepreneurs and executives.

Use Worldviews & Storytelling to Build a Strong Brand Positioning

There’s something that the most successful brands do well:

They leverage existing beliefs to tell stories.

That’s because a person’s way of viewing the world is a major indicator of the decisions they make and the types of stories that resonate with them.

(Some call these beliefs “mindset”. In Positioning, Al Ries used the term “customers’ minds”. In All Marketers Are Liars, Seth Godin used the term “worldview” that I like the most, as the word is self-explanatory.)

As a marketer or innovator, using worldviews to look at your market helps you understand what stories resonate with your target customers, what products and services they consider buying, and why.

How to Get Your Dream Job After an MBA or MSc

From day 1 at business school, you’re already thinking about the future.

You’ve not even settled down. And you’re already looking forward to getting a dream job in a kick-ass company.

Let’s see how you can get this done, the right way.

What the Hell Is Happening to the Job Market?

As a business school student, you’re ambitious and have high expectations for yourself. Right? So you want to prove that you can get the job you want.

Here’s the thing:

The job market is saturated. Each job opening gets hundreds of applications.

Minimum Viable Audience: A Proactive Way to Do Market Research

Most attempts to innovate are product-driven. Someone has a cool idea for a product. And then a marketing team has to find a market for the new concept.

Products are born this way because it’s less demanding to start with an idea than with an audience.

That’s the wrong way to develop innovative products. In the words of Seth Godin:

“You don’t find customers for your products. You find products for your customers.”

— Seth Godin

We can all agree that:

– Creating something is easy.

– Creating something that people care about is much more difficult.

Estonian Mafia: A Technology Powerhouse that Influences the World

Estonia?

Two years ago, I knew nothing about this small European country. Then, I started working with the Estonian Mafia. It changed how I think about innovation.

A No-limit Country

We are our own limits. Marcus Aurelius said it very well:

“The mind knows no obstructions, except those from within.”

Estonians decided that limits weren’t a good idea. So they used digital technology to get rid some limits:

  • Kazaa popularised peer-to-peer download;
  • Skype made flying for a meeting out of fashion;
  • Playtech changed what going to casino means;
  • TransferWise transformed how transferring money abroad is being done.

This Is How You Plan & Run a Great Workshop

Running a workshop is an effective way to train a group or get them to do collaborative work.

But there’s still lots of misunderstanding around how to do this.

As part of running innovation projects at What If, we use workshops as a tool to harvest and leverage the creativity of our project teams.

Though I cannot recreate online the exciting experience of participating in one of these workshops, I wanted to share with you some of the most useful things you can implement in your workshops.

19 Things to Keep in Mind Before Speaking in Public

Knowing how to deliver a great speech is an essential skill for a leader.

Martin Luther King Jr., Steve Jobs, Barack Obama… They are great speakers. We all remember them for how they spoke in public.

But we don’t deliver speeches to such large audiences every day. Right?

We’re more likely to talk to the team we lead, to present something to stakeholders, or to speak at an event.

So it’s good to use these public figures to inspire us. But we also need practical tools to improve how we convey a message or tell a story.